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Ruth’s article in the April Diary March 26, 2020

Posted by nicholastufton in The Diary Monthly letter.
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Jules Verne, the imaginative travel writer, wrote that “solitude and isolation are painful things and beyond human endurance”. The coronavirus crisis has brought with it increased isolation from each other and withdrawal from much of our social contact.

At church we are also following strict guidelines to keep us safe – we are no longer sharing wine, we are encouraged to receive standing in order not to touch the altar rail, we have been advised not to offer refreshments, and we will require each person to wash or sanitise their hands on arrival in church. We no longer share the peace with a handshake but are exploring waving to each other, sign language and with elbow bumping! (https://www.churchofengland.org/more/media-centre/coronavirus-covid-19-guidance-churches)

The film The Greatest Showman shows a circus drawing in those who had previously been isolated and marginalised because of difference. Gradually they gain confidence and become a family, a community strengthening and encouraging each other. But the church is more than the building in our villages, it is the community of people who care for each other, encourage each other and support each other. There are many parallels with the film. We care not just for each other but for all. Where people are increasingly isolated and events cancelled, we will offer the sort of care, companionship and prayer which the church has always given, within the health guidelines.

If you need help with shopping or a chat, a visit from someone who will take health precautions seriously or medical prescriptions collected, then contact or message Ruth or one of the churchwardens. We are blessed with communications technology which will allow us to stay in touch with each other, through Facebook, WhatsApp or simple phone calls. Novels, paintings and films may lift our spirits.

April brings Holy Week – the week when Jesus embraced the isolation of exclusion and loneliness and death – but it also brings Easter, when he rose from the dead to new life and hope, and the Christian community began to grow. May we grow as a community and find ways to reach through the isolation and solitude that may be forced upon us for a time, and pray especially for those in need.

Ruth

Sonia’s article in March’s Diary February 24, 2020

Posted by nicholastufton in The Diary Monthly letter.
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Feast and fast

Finished Frugal February after Veganuary, Dry January or even, ‘let’s sign up for the gymn-againuary’? How did they work for you? Post-prandial penance and pre-celebratory fasting have been part of many societies’ traditions, often encompassed within religious practices. Self-denial, whatever form it takes, can help us become more mindful of things we would otherwise take for granted. While catching ourselves reaching for a bacon butty, chocolate or an alcoholic drink, we may consider those in the world who don’t have enough, as our stomach rumbles. It’s often only by changing our routines that we become aware of how ingrained habits have become.

We are in the Church season of Lent. The name derives from the Old English word, lencten, meaning spring season and is also associated with lengthening days. It is a period of preparation, not so much for our bodies to look more Instagram-worthy, as for us to be ready to contemplate the awesomeness of God. How God restored our fractured relationship with him caused by our wrongdoing. This was achieved was by God the Son coming to earth in person, being born as a baby named Jesus. Jesus then took the deathly consequences of all our sins by living a full, sin-free life, teaching about the Kingdom of God, being betrayed by a friend, suffering a sham trial, being flogged and crucified.

To prepare for his time of teaching, Jesus had spent 40 days in the desert praying and fasting. He resisted the temptation to magic up food, enjoy worldly power and test God by reckless behaviour. Christians, less drastically, prepare by prayer and often by giving up something enjoyable; maybe chocolate or alcohol or even gossiping! Each time we are tempted to indulge, we stop and remember Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross. Of course, this was followed by his being miraculously raised from the dead on Easter Sunday. We are offered the gift of joyous everlasting life if we acknowledge Jesus as our Lord and saviour and believe that God raised him from the dead.

Many blessings

Sonia  07747 844265

Ruth’s article in the February Diary January 24, 2020

Posted by nicholastufton in The Diary Monthly letter.
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During the year ahead there may be changes which are inevitable, some unwelcome, others necessary and some desirable. Biology shows that change is part of life and growth. The baby learns to walk and talk, the child to read and play; their independence increases. In the world we need to change the ways in which our use of Earth’s resources affect climate change. You may have other changes looming – a wedding, a new job, a move.

In our churches and church schools we have been considering a change, as we decide whether to seek permission to admit children to communion before they are confirmed. That final decision is scheduled for our church council meetings in March – and if all three councils agree, we will apply to the bishop. Children admitted to communion would have to be baptised, aged around seven, and attend either school or church worship on a regular basis. Parents will have to give permission and will be included in the classes alongside their children.

There are many reasons behind this to consider and I would like to share some of them. Historically in the early Church, whole families were baptised and shared together in the church. The Jewish roots of the Christian faith remind us of the centrality of children in the story: they asked the questions at Passover. Increasingly families discover faith together and preparation for communion enables them to learn and experience together.

Only at the Reformation was there an expectation of understanding the nature of the bread and wine. Then, as Communion became the main Sunday morning service with all ages gathered at the altar, the issue of children receiving with their parents and other adults grew more significant.

Theologically the bread and wine is more often seen as food for the soul, strength for the Christian journey and a free gift of God’s great love rather than a reward for understanding (see https://www.stalbans.anglican. org/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/preparingtheway2013.pdf for more information). Please talk with me or members of your church council. Many churches have taken this path already and found it a joy, as children mark their growing sense of belonging to God’s family.

So please pray about this, come to the United Benefice service at Reed on 9th February at 10.30am ready to ask your questions and express your thoughts.

Ruth

 

 

Safeguarding details June 27, 2019

Posted by nicholastufton in Safeguarding Details.
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Please click on the link below:

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Our United Benefice is proud to be a part of the Diocese of St. Albans in the Church of England, whose Archbishops, Bishops, clergy and leaders are absolutely committed to safeguarding as an integral part of the life and ministry of the Church.

Safeguarding means the action the Church takes to promote a safer culture. This means we will promote the welfare of children, young people and adults, work to prevent abuse from occurring, seek to protect those that are at risk of being abused and respond well to those that have been abused. We will take care to identify where a person may present a risk to others, and offer support to them whilst taking steps to mitigate such risks.

The Church of England affirms the ‘Whole Church’ approach to safeguarding. This approach encompasses a commitment to consistent policy and practice across all Church bodies, Church Officers and that everyone associated with the Church, who comes into contact with children, young people and adults, has a role to play.

The Church will take appropriate steps to maintain a safer environment for all and to practice fully and positively Christ’s Ministry towards children, young people and adults; to respond sensitively and compassionately to their needs in order to help keep them safe from harm.

Although safeguarding is the responsibility of everyone here at St Mary’s; Donna Stratton is our designated Safeguarding Lead and can be contacted about any safeguarding matter on 07932677934. You can also speak to our Rector, The Revd Canon Ruth Pyke, on 01763 848756 or leave an email via ruthpyke56@gmail.com

Two very useful links:

More information on the Church of England’s National Safeguarding can be found here: www.churchofengland.org/safeguarding

More information about Safeguarding in the Diocese of St. Albans can be found here: https://www.stalbans.anglican.org/diocese/safeguarding

Recording and live streaming services

1)  Following changes in worship patterns due to the pandemic, services from the churches in Barkway Barley and Reed may be recorded and or live-streamed. Streaming will not normally include images of the congregation, but of ministers and leaders.  Any images of the congregation will be distant or in passing. There will be no images of people in close up, praying, or at the communion rail.

3) Worshippers will be advised if a service is being recorded/live-streamed through announcements in church and via the weekly notice sheet.  A notice is also by placed at the entrance to the church and on the noticeboard.

2)  Only ministers leading the service will be filmed, and, if those leading readings and intercessions are likely to be on film, their permission will be sought beforehand.

3)   If children are going to appear on the recording or live stream, the express permission of their parents/guardians will be sought prior to filming.

Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Historic Churches Bike’n Hike June 27, 2019

Posted by nicholastufton in Historic Churches Trust Bicycle Ride.
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The event was held on a glorious sunny day last September and raised a staggering £113,000.  The Buntingford Deanery raised £11,386, which is a record.  Reed were our star performers and they raised £2,454 including Gift Aid.

The idea is that people are sponsored to drive, walk or cycle to visit as many churches as possible during the day. Half of the money raised is retained by the Trust to help fund repairs to churches and the other half comes straight back to the churches in our Benefice (Barkway, Barley, Reed and Buckland). The event takes place nationwide on the second Saturday and this year is on Saturday 11 September between 9am and 5pm.

The event presents a wonderful opportunity to raise much needed funds for our parish churches, where income has fallen because fund raising events have been limited because of Covid.

To donate or to obtain further details, please contact:-
Nicholas Tufton Tel: 848888 (Barkway)
Sophia Wrangham Tel: 848699 (Barley)
Karin Weston Tel: 271912 (Buckland)
Liz Jakeman  Tel: 848398 (Reed)

There is the link to the Trust’s web site: http://www.bedshertshct.org.uk/

Data Privacy Notice February 26, 2019

Posted by nicholastufton in Data Privacy Notice.
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DATA PRIVACY NOTICE

 The Benefice of Barkway, Barley, Reed and Buckland comprising:

 Parochial Church Council (PCC) of St Mary Magdalene Barkway
Parochial Church Council (PCC) of
St Margaret of Antioch Barley
Parochial Church Council (PCC) of St Mary Reed and St Andrew Buckland

 hereinafter referred to as The Benefice

  1. Your personal data – what is it?
    Personal data relates to a living individual who can be identified from that data.  Identification can be by the information alone or in conjunction with any other information in the data controller’s possession or likely to come into such possession. The processing of personal data is governed by the General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”).
  1. Who are we?
    The Benefice is the data controller (contact details below).  This means it decides how your personal data is processed and for what purposes.
  1. How do we process your personal data?
    The Benefice complies with its obligations under the “GDPR” by keeping personal data up to date; by storing and destroying it securely; by not collecting or retaining excessive amounts of data; by protecting personal data from loss, misuse, unauthorised access and disclosure and by ensuring that appropriate technical measures are in place to protect personal data.We use your personal data for the following purposes: –
  • To enable us to provide a voluntary service for the benefit of the public in a particular geographical area as specified in our constitution;
  • To administer membership records;
  • To fundraise and promote the interests of the charity;
  • To manage our employees and volunteers;
  • To maintain our own accounts and records (including the processing of gift aid applications);
  • To inform you of news, events, activities and services running across The Benefice;
  • To share your contact details with the Diocesan office so they can keep you informed about news in the diocese and events, activities and services that will be occurring in the diocese and in which you may be interested.
  1. What is the legal basis for processing your personal data?
  • Explicit consent of the data subject so that we can keep you informed about news, events, activities and services and keep you informed about diocesan events.
  • Processing is necessary for carrying out legal obligations in relation to Gift Aid or under employment, social security or social protection law, or a collective agreement;
  • Legitimate interests and Legitimate Activity. Processing is carried out by a not-for-profit body with a political, philosophical, religious or trade union aim provided: –
    • the processing relates only to members or former members (or those who have regular contact with it in connection with those purposes); and
    • there is no disclosure to a third party without consent.
  1. Sharing your personal data
    Your personal data will be treated as strictly confidential and will only be shared with other members of the church in order to carry out a service to other church members or for purposes connected with the church. We will only share your data with third parties outside of the parish with your consent.
  1. How long do we keep your personal data?
    We keep data in accordance with the guidance set out in the guide “Keep or Bin: Care of Your Parish Records” which is available from the Church of England website [see footnote for link].Specifically, we retain electoral roll data while it is still current; gift aid declarations and associated paperwork for up to 6 years after the calendar year to which they relate; and parish registers (baptisms, marriages, funerals) permanently.
  1. Your rights and your personal data
    Unless subject to an exemption under the GDPR, you have the following rights with respect to your personal data: –
  • The right to request a copy of your personal data which the Benefice holds about you;
  • The right to request that the Benefice corrects any personal data if it is found to be inaccurate or out of date;
  • The right to request your personal data is erased where it is no longer necessary for the Benefice to retain such data;
  • The right to withdraw your consent to the processing at any time
  • The right to request that the data controller provide the data subject with his/her personal data.
  • The right, where there is a dispute in relation to the accuracy or processing of your personal data, to request a restriction is placed on further processing;
  • The right to object to the processing of personal data.
  • The right to lodge a complaint with the Information Commissioners Office.
  1. Further processing
    If we wish to use your personal data for a new purpose, not covered by this Data Protection Notice, then we will provide you with a new notice explaining this new use prior to commencing the processing and setting out the relevant purposes and processing conditions. Where and whenever necessary, we will seek your prior consent to the new processing.

      9 Contact Details
To exercise all relevant rights, queries of complaints please in the first instance contact
The Reverend Canon Ruth Pyke, The Rectory, 135 High Street, Barkway, Royston, SG8 8ED.
(01763 848756)   ruthpyke56@gmail.com

You can contact the Information Commissioners Office on 0303 123 1113 or via email https://ico.org.uk/global/contact-us/email/ or at the Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire. SK9 5AF.

Details about retention periods can currently be found in the Record Management Guides located on the Church of England website at: – https://www.churchofengland.org/more/libraries-and-archives/records-management-guides

Recording and live streaming services

1)  Following changes in worship patterns due to the pandemic, services from the churches in Barkway, Barley and Reed may be recorded and or live-streamed. Streaming will not normally include images of the congregation, but of ministers and leaders.  Any images of the congregation will be distant or in passing. There will be no images of people in close up, praying, or at the communion rail.

3) Worshippers will be advised if a service is being recorded/live-streamed through announcements in church and via the weekly notice sheet.  A notice is also by placed at the entrance to the church and on the noticeboard.

2)  Only ministers leading the service will be filmed, and, if those leading readings and intercessions are likely to be on film, their permission will be sought beforehand.

3)   If children are going to appear on the recording or live stream, the express permission of their parents/guardians will be sought prior to filming.